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Connecting Technology and Business.

Improve productivity using Colors in Outlook items

​Color adds visibility to your Outlook items. Color categories can be assigned to email messages in Microsoft Outlook, which enables you to quickly identify them and associate them with related items. You can assign more than one color category to messages, or use a Quick Click category to click once and assign a color category to a message in your Inbox

Assign a color category to a message 

A color category must be in the color category list before you can assign it. If a color category is not listed, you can create a color category and assign it to an item for the first time. You can also choose from several default color categories and rename them to be more meaningful to you.

 

To assign a color category, do the following:
  • For a message in your Inbox or any message list Right-click the message, point to Categorize, and then click a color category.
  • For an open message On the Message tab, in the Options group, click Categorize, and then click a color category.
To see more categories or to create a category, click All Categories to open the Color Categories dialog box. To assign a color category from the Color Categories dialog box, you must select the check box next to the color category. The Color Categories dialog box is also a quick way to assign multiple categories to an item.
 
The first time that you assign a default color category to an item, you'll be prompted to rename the category. At this time, you can also change the color of the category and choose a keyboard shortcut.
Notes  
  • You can change the color associated with a category at any time.
  • Another way to open the Categorize menu and Color Categories dialog box is by clicking Categorize on the ribbon, on the Tags tab.
  • Only the 15 most recently used color categories appear on the Categorize menu. To see the rest, click All Categories on the Categorize menu.

Cloud Computing - the tax angle

Tax issues up in the air

Most domestic tax laws and treaty provisions that apply to cross-border transactions were designed for bricks-and-mortar companies. Many rules apply based on physical location to determine whether a payment is from a domestic or foreign source. The source of income can affect whether foreign tax credits are available to offset foreign taxes paid. It can also affect whether withholding taxes are imposed on payments received from cloud computing transactions and whether tax treaty relief is available on that income.

 

But device and location independence are two of the cloud’s key features. In any given cloud network, the cloud service provider may own or manage many servers, routers and other technical data storage devices off-site, possibly located across multiple systems and countries around the world. Some of the specific tax complexities that can result are as follows.
 
Nature of payment
 
The tax treatment of a cloud user’s payments for cloud computing services depends on the extent of the user’s rights to use the cloud computing software. Whether the payment is characterised as sales income, service income or royalty can dramatically affect how and where the income is taxed, and whether withholding taxes or tax treaty relief will apply.
Sales income – A computer program is sold when the transfer includes all substantial rights and burdens of ownership. Sales income is generally sourced to where the property is produced and/or to where the sale takes place (e.g., where title and benefits and burdens of ownership pass to the buyer). In the cloud computing context, all production activities are rarely conducted in one location, and so pinpointing the payment’s source may not be straightforward.
Service income – Generally, income derived from the provision of services is sourced to where the services are performed. Like sales transactions, all of the inputs that make up a cloud service offering are rarely conducted in a single jurisdiction.
Royalties – If the cloud user gains the right to exploit intellectual property, the payment is a royalty. These payments are sourced to where the intangible property is used (exploited) and, unlike payments for services, they may attract withholding taxes in the payer’s jurisdiction.
 
Value-added taxes
 
Providing cloud computing services can create VAT registration, collection and reporting obligations in the jurisdictions where the services are consumed. A number of countries offer relief for electronically delivered services or the possibility of exempting certain forms of software services in their entirety.
 
Permanent establishment
 
Cloud service users and providers need to determine whether their activities or operations are substantial enough to create a taxable presence in a foreign jurisdiction. If so, they may become liable for tax in the foreign country. Relief may be available under an applicable income tax treaty.
 
Transfer pricing
 
Cloud computing businesses face transfer pricing issues raised by how the value of the business is distributed among the intellectual property, cloud computing infrastructure, and supporting personnel. Where more than one entity combine efforts to provide a cloud computing offering to customers, the business will need to evaluate each entity’s economic contribution to the effort and compensate each entity according to arm’s-length principles.
 
Developing your tax strategy for cloud computing
 
Clearly, with the high degree of tax uncertainties involved and the current lack of administrative guidelines, it is vital for organisations engaged in cloud computing – whether as providers or customers – to put in place comprehensive tax strategies for undertaking cloud computing projects. 
 
In developing this strategy, organisations should begin by mapping out the project’s system of international payments and services, including their location, direction, risk and beneficiaries. Project managers should then work with their tax teams or independent tax advisers to take a position on the nature of payments and permanent establishment and withholding tax risks inherent in their system. From there, project managers can adjust their systems and take other mitigating steps, such as entering discussions with tax authorities or obtaining advanced rulings, to put the organisations in the best tax position possible.
 
Organisations that do this from the outset will gain a significant long-term advantage over any competitors who fail to comprehensively address the tax risks and opportunities arising from the burgeoning new cloud computing industry.
- A KPMG whitepaper

Create Search Folders to find messages fast

Search Folders are a quick and convenient way to look at predefined collections of email messages. They don't actually store any messages themselves but, instead, are virtual folders that offer a view of all the messages stored in your mailbox depending on the attributes you've defined. Outlook provides default Search Folders—such as Unread Mail—but you can also create your own. For instance, you can use Search Folders to help you find all the information related to a particular project, an important client, or an upcoming conference.

 

  • To create a Search Folder in Outlook 2010, in Mail, on the Folder tab, in the New group, click New Search Folder.
  • To create a Search Folder in Outlook 2007 or Outlook 2003, in Mail, on the File menu, point to New, and then click Search Folder.

 

In all versions of Outlook, specify whether you want to use a predefined Search Folder or to create your own custom folder, and then follow the instructions on the screen.

Function Keys in Excel 2010

KeyDescription
F1
Displays the Excel Help task pane.
CTRL+F1 displays or hides the ribbon.
ALT+F1 creates an embedded chart of the data in the current range.
ALT+SHIFT+F1 inserts a new worksheet.
F2
Edits the active cell and positions the insertion point at the end of the cell contents. It also moves the insertion point into the Formula Bar when editing in a cell is turned off.
SHIFT+F2 adds or edits a cell comment.
CTRL+F2 displays the print preview area on the Print tab in the Backstage view.
F3
Displays the Paste Name dialog box. Available only if there are existing names in the workbook.
SHIFT+F3 displays the Insert Function dialog box.
F4
Repeats the last command or action, if possible.
When a cell reference or range is selected in a formula, F4 cycles through all the various combinations of absolute and relative references.
CTRL+F4 closes the selected workbook window.
ALT+F4 closes Excel.
F5
Displays the Go To dialog box.
CTRL+F5 restores the window size of the selected workbook window.
F6
Switches between the worksheet, ribbon, task pane, and Zoom controls. In a worksheet that has been split (View menu, Manage This Window, Freeze Panes, Split Window command), F6 includes the split panes when switching between panes and the ribbon area.
SHIFT+F6 switches between the worksheet, Zoom controls, task pane, and ribbon.
CTRL+F6 switches to the next workbook window when more than one workbook window is open.
F7
Displays the Spelling dialog box to check spelling in the active worksheet or selected range.
CTRL+F7 performs the Move command on the workbook window when it is not maximized. Use the arrow keys to move the window, and when finished press ENTER, or ESC to cancel.
F8
Turns extend mode on or off. In extend mode, Extended Selection appears in the status line, and the arrow keys extend the selection.
SHIFT+F8 enables you to add a nonadjacent cell or range to a selection of cells by using the arrow keys.
CTRL+F8 performs the Size command (on the Control menu for the workbook window) when a workbook is not maximized.
ALT+F8 displays the Macro dialog box to create, run, edit, or delete a macro.
F9
Calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks.
SHIFT+F9 calculates the active worksheet.
CTRL+ALT+F9 calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.
CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+F9 rechecks dependent formulas, and then calculates all cells in all open workbooks, including cells not marked as needing to be calculated.
CTRL+F9 minimizes a workbook window to an icon.
F10
Turns key tips on or off. (Pressing ALT does the same thing.)
SHIFT+F10 displays the shortcut menu for a selected item.
ALT+SHIFT+F10 displays the menu or message for an Error Checking button.
CTRL+F10 maximizes or restores the selected workbook window.
F11
Creates a chart of the data in the current range in a separate Chart sheet.
SHIFT+F11 inserts a new worksheet.
ALT+F11 opens the Microsoft Visual Basic For Applications Editor, in which you can create a macro by using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).
F12Displays the Save As dialog box.
KeyDescription
F1
Displays the Excel Help task pane.
CTRL+F1 displays or hides the ribbon.
ALT+F1 creates an embedded chart of the data in the current range.
ALT+SHIFT+F1 inserts a new worksheet.
F2
Edits the active cell and positions the insertion point at the end of the cell contents. It also moves the insertion point into the Formula Bar when editing in a cell is turned off.
SHIFT+F2 adds or edits a cell comment.
CTRL+F2 displays the print preview area on the Print tab in the Backstage view.
F3
Displays the Paste Name dialog box. Available only if there are existing names in the workbook.
SHIFT+F3 displays the Insert Function dialog box.
F4
Repeats the last command or action, if possible.
When a cell reference or range is selected in a formula, F4 cycles through all the various combinations of absolute and relative references.
CTRL+F4 closes the selected workbook window.
ALT+F4 closes Excel.
F5
Displays the Go To dialog box.
CTRL+F5 restores the window size of the selected workbook window.
F6
Switches between the worksheet, ribbon, task pane, and Zoom controls. In a worksheet that has been split (View menu, Manage This Window, Freeze Panes, Split Window command), F6 includes the split panes when switching between panes and the ribbon area.
SHIFT+F6 switches between the worksheet, Zoom controls, task pane, and ribbon.
CTRL+F6 switches to the next workbook window when more than one workbook window is open.
F7
Displays the Spelling dialog box to check spelling in the active worksheet or selected range.
CTRL+F7 performs the Move command on the workbook window when it is not maximized. Use the arrow keys to move the window, and when finished press ENTER, or ESC to cancel.
F8
Turns extend mode on or off. In extend mode, Extended Selection appears in the status line, and the arrow keys extend the selection.
SHIFT+F8 enables you to add a nonadjacent cell or range to a selection of cells by using the arrow keys.
CTRL+F8 performs the Size command (on the Control menu for the workbook window) when a workbook is not maximized.
ALT+F8 displays the Macro dialog box to create, run, edit, or delete a macro.
F9
Calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks.
SHIFT+F9 calculates the active worksheet.
CTRL+ALT+F9 calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.
CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+F9 rechecks dependent formulas, and then calculates all cells in all open workbooks, including cells not marked as needing to be calculated.
CTRL+F9 minimizes a workbook window to an icon.
F10
Turns key tips on or off. (Pressing ALT does the same thing.)
SHIFT+F10 displays the shortcut menu for a selected item.
ALT+SHIFT+F10 displays the menu or message for an Error Checking button.
CTRL+F10 maximizes or restores the selected workbook window.
F11
Creates a chart of the data in the current range in a separate Chart sheet.
SHIFT+F11 inserts a new worksheet.
ALT+F11 opens the Microsoft Visual Basic For Applications Editor, in which you can create a macro by using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).
F12Displays the Save As dialog box.
KeyDescription
F1
Displays the Excel Help task pane.
CTRL+F1 displays or hides the ribbon.
ALT+F1 creates an embedded chart of the data in the current range.
ALT+SHIFT+F1 inserts a new worksheet.
F2
Edits the active cell and positions the insertion point at the end of the cell contents. It also moves the insertion point into the Formula Bar when editing in a cell is turned off.
SHIFT+F2 adds or edits a cell comment.
CTRL+F2 displays the print preview area on the Print tab in the Backstage view.
F3
Displays the Paste Name dialog box. Available only if there are existing names in the workbook.
SHIFT+F3 displays the Insert Function dialog box.
F4
Repeats the last command or action, if possible.
When a cell reference or range is selected in a formula, F4 cycles through all the various combinations of absolute and relative references.
CTRL+F4 closes the selected workbook window.
ALT+F4 closes Excel.
F5
Displays the Go To dialog box.
CTRL+F5 restores the window size of the selected workbook window.
F6
Switches between the worksheet, ribbon, task pane, and Zoom controls. In a worksheet that has been split (View menu, Manage This Window, Freeze Panes, Split Window command), F6 includes the split panes when switching between panes and the ribbon area.
SHIFT+F6 switches between the worksheet, Zoom controls, task pane, and ribbon.
CTRL+F6 switches to the next workbook window when more than one workbook window is open.
F7
Displays the Spelling dialog box to check spelling in the active worksheet or selected range.
CTRL+F7 performs the Move command on the workbook window when it is not maximized. Use the arrow keys to move the window, and when finished press ENTER, or ESC to cancel.
F8
Turns extend mode on or off. In extend mode, Extended Selection appears in the status line, and the arrow keys extend the selection.
SHIFT+F8 enables you to add a nonadjacent cell or range to a selection of cells by using the arrow keys.
CTRL+F8 performs the Size command (on the Control menu for the workbook window) when a workbook is not maximized.
ALT+F8 displays the Macro dialog box to create, run, edit, or delete a macro.
F9
Calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks.
SHIFT+F9 calculates the active worksheet.
CTRL+ALT+F9 calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.
CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+F9 rechecks dependent formulas, and then calculates all cells in all open workbooks, including cells not marked as needing to be calculated.
CTRL+F9 minimizes a workbook window to an icon.
F10
Turns key tips on or off. (Pressing ALT does the same thing.)
SHIFT+F10 displays the shortcut menu for a selected item.
ALT+SHIFT+F10 displays the menu or message for an Error Checking button.
CTRL+F10 maximizes or restores the selected workbook window.
F11
Creates a chart of the data in the current range in a separate Chart sheet.
SHIFT+F11 inserts a new worksheet.
ALT+F11 opens the Microsoft Visual Basic For Applications Editor, in which you can create a macro by using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).
F12Displays the Save As dialog box.
KeyDescription
F1
Displays the Excel Help task pane.
CTRL+F1 displays or hides the ribbon.
ALT+F1 creates an embedded chart of the data in the current range.
ALT+SHIFT+F1 inserts a new worksheet.
F2
Edits the active cell and positions the insertion point at the end of the cell contents. It also moves the insertion point into the Formula Bar when editing in a cell is turned off.
SHIFT+F2 adds or edits a cell comment.
CTRL+F2 displays the print preview area on the Print tab in the Backstage view.
F3
Displays the Paste Name dialog box. Available only if there are existing names in the workbook.
SHIFT+F3 displays the Insert Function dialog box.
F4
Repeats the last command or action, if possible.
When a cell reference or range is selected in a formula, F4 cycles through all the various combinations of absolute and relative references.
CTRL+F4 closes the selected workbook window.
ALT+F4 closes Excel.
F5
Displays the Go To dialog box.
CTRL+F5 restores the window size of the selected workbook window.
F6
Switches between the worksheet, ribbon, task pane, and Zoom controls. In a worksheet that has been split (View menu, Manage This Window, Freeze Panes, Split Window command), F6 includes the split panes when switching between panes and the ribbon area.
SHIFT+F6 switches between the worksheet, Zoom controls, task pane, and ribbon.
CTRL+F6 switches to the next workbook window when more than one workbook window is open.
F7
Displays the Spelling dialog box to check spelling in the active worksheet or selected range.
CTRL+F7 performs the Move command on the workbook window when it is not maximized. Use the arrow keys to move the window, and when finished press ENTER, or ESC to cancel.
F8
Turns extend mode on or off. In extend mode, Extended Selection appears in the status line, and the arrow keys extend the selection.
SHIFT+F8 enables you to add a nonadjacent cell or range to a selection of cells by using the arrow keys.
CTRL+F8 performs the Size command (on the Control menu for the workbook window) when a workbook is not maximized.
ALT+F8 displays the Macro dialog box to create, run, edit, or delete a macro.
F9
Calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks.
SHIFT+F9 calculates the active worksheet.
CTRL+ALT+F9 calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.
CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+F9 rechecks dependent formulas, and then calculates all cells in all open workbooks, including cells not marked as needing to be calculated.
CTRL+F9 minimizes a workbook window to an icon.
F10
Turns key tips on or off. (Pressing ALT does the same thing.)
SHIFT+F10 displays the shortcut menu for a selected item.
ALT+SHIFT+F10 displays the menu or message for an Error Checking button.
CTRL+F10 maximizes or restores the selected workbook window.
F11
Creates a chart of the data in the current range in a separate Chart sheet.
SHIFT+F11 inserts a new worksheet.
ALT+F11 opens the Microsoft Visual Basic For Applications Editor, in which you can create a macro by using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).
F12Displays the Save As dialog box.
KeyDescription
F1
Displays the Excel Help task pane.
CTRL+F1 displays or hides the ribbon.
ALT+F1 creates an embedded chart of the data in the current range.
ALT+SHIFT+F1 inserts a new worksheet.
F2
Edits the active cell and positions the insertion point at the end of the cell contents. It also moves the insertion point into the Formula Bar when editing in a cell is turned off.
SHIFT+F2 adds or edits a cell comment.
CTRL+F2 displays the print preview area on the Print tab in the Backstage view.
F3
Displays the Paste Name dialog box. Available only if there are existing names in the workbook.
SHIFT+F3 displays the Insert Function dialog box.
F4
Repeats the last command or action, if possible.
When a cell reference or range is selected in a formula, F4 cycles through all the various combinations of absolute and relative references.
CTRL+F4 closes the selected workbook window.
ALT+F4 closes Excel.
F5
Displays the Go To dialog box.
CTRL+F5 restores the window size of the selected workbook window.
F6
Switches between the worksheet, ribbon, task pane, and Zoom controls. In a worksheet that has been split (View menu, Manage This Window, Freeze Panes, Split Window command), F6 includes the split panes when switching between panes and the ribbon area.
SHIFT+F6 switches between the worksheet, Zoom controls, task pane, and ribbon.
CTRL+F6 switches to the next workbook window when more than one workbook window is open.
F7
Displays the Spelling dialog box to check spelling in the active worksheet or selected range.
CTRL+F7 performs the Move command on the workbook window when it is not maximized. Use the arrow keys to move the window, and when finished press ENTER, or ESC to cancel.
F8
Turns extend mode on or off. In extend mode, Extended Selection appears in the status line, and the arrow keys extend the selection.
SHIFT+F8 enables you to add a nonadjacent cell or range to a selection of cells by using the arrow keys.
CTRL+F8 performs the Size command (on the Control menu for the workbook window) when a workbook is not maximized.
ALT+F8 displays the Macro dialog box to create, run, edit, or delete a macro.
F9
Calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks.
SHIFT+F9 calculates the active worksheet.
CTRL+ALT+F9 calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.
CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+F9 rechecks dependent formulas, and then calculates all cells in all open workbooks, including cells not marked as needing to be calculated.
CTRL+F9 minimizes a workbook window to an icon.
F10
Turns key tips on or off. (Pressing ALT does the same thing.)
SHIFT+F10 displays the shortcut menu for a selected item.
ALT+SHIFT+F10 displays the menu or message for an Error Checking button.
CTRL+F10 maximizes or restores the selected workbook window.
F11
Creates a chart of the data in the current range in a separate Chart sheet.
SHIFT+F11 inserts a new worksheet.
ALT+F11 opens the Microsoft Visual Basic For Applications Editor, in which you can create a macro by using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).
F12Displays the Save As dialog box.
KeyDescription
F1
Displays the Excel Help task pane.
CTRL+F1 displays or hides the ribbon.
ALT+F1 creates an embedded chart of the data in the current range.
ALT+SHIFT+F1 inserts a new worksheet.
F2
Edits the active cell and positions the insertion point at the end of the cell contents. It also moves the insertion point into the Formula Bar when editing in a cell is turned off.
SHIFT+F2 adds or edits a cell comment.
CTRL+F2 displays the print preview area on the Print tab in the Backstage view.
F3
Displays the Paste Name dialog box. Available only if there are existing names in the workbook.
SHIFT+F3 displays the Insert Function dialog box.
F4
Repeats the last command or action, if possible.
When a cell reference or range is selected in a formula, F4 cycles through all the various combinations of absolute and relative references.
CTRL+F4 closes the selected workbook window.
ALT+F4 closes Excel.
F5
Displays the Go To dialog box.
CTRL+F5 restores the window size of the selected workbook window.
F6
Switches between the worksheet, ribbon, task pane, and Zoom controls. In a worksheet that has been split (View menu, Manage This Window, Freeze Panes, Split Window command), F6 includes the split panes when switching between panes and the ribbon area.
SHIFT+F6 switches between the worksheet, Zoom controls, task pane, and ribbon.
CTRL+F6 switches to the next workbook window when more than one workbook window is open.
F7
Displays the Spelling dialog box to check spelling in the active worksheet or selected range.
CTRL+F7 performs the Move command on the workbook window when it is not maximized. Use the arrow keys to move the window, and when finished press ENTER, or ESC to cancel.
F8
Turns extend mode on or off. In extend mode, Extended Selection appears in the status line, and the arrow keys extend the selection.
SHIFT+F8 enables you to add a nonadjacent cell or range to a selection of cells by using the arrow keys.
CTRL+F8 performs the Size command (on the Control menu for the workbook window) when a workbook is not maximized.
ALT+F8 displays the Macro dialog box to create, run, edit, or delete a macro.
F9
Calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks.
SHIFT+F9 calculates the active worksheet.
CTRL+ALT+F9 calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.
CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+F9 rechecks dependent formulas, and then calculates all cells in all open workbooks, including cells not marked as needing to be calculated.
CTRL+F9 minimizes a workbook window to an icon.
F10
Turns key tips on or off. (Pressing ALT does the same thing.)
SHIFT+F10 displays the shortcut menu for a selected item.
ALT+SHIFT+F10 displays the menu or message for an Error Checking button.
CTRL+F10 maximizes or restores the selected workbook window.
F11
Creates a chart of the data in the current range in a separate Chart sheet.
SHIFT+F11 inserts a new worksheet.
ALT+F11 opens the Microsoft Visual Basic For Applications Editor, in which you can create a macro by using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).
F12Displays the Save As dialog box.

Key

Description

F1

Displays the Excel Help task pane.

CTRL+F1 displays or hides the ribbon.

ALT+F1 creates an embedded chart of the data in the current range.

ALT+SHIFT+F1 inserts a new worksheet.

F2

Edits the active cell and positions the insertion point at the end of the cell contents. It also moves the insertion point into the Formula Bar when editing in a cell is turned off.

SHIFT+F2 adds or edits a cell comment.

CTRL+F2 displays the print preview area on the Print tab in the Backstage view.

F3

Displays the Paste Name dialog box. Available only if there are existing names in the workbook.

SHIFT+F3 displays the Insert Function dialog box.

F4

Repeats the last command or action, if possible.

When a cell reference or range is selected in a formula, F4 cycles through all the various combinations of absolute and relative references.

CTRL+F4 closes the selected workbook window.

ALT+F4 closes Excel.

F5

Displays the Go To dialog box.

CTRL+F5 restores the window size of the selected workbook window.

F6

Switches between the worksheet, ribbon, task pane, and Zoom controls. In a worksheet that has been split (View menu, Manage This Window, Freeze Panes, Split Window command), F6 includes the split panes when switching between panes and the ribbon area.

SHIFT+F6 switches between the worksheet, Zoom controls, task pane, and ribbon.

CTRL+F6 switches to the next workbook window when more than one workbook window is open.

F7

Displays the Spelling dialog box to check spelling in the active worksheet or selected range.

CTRL+F7 performs the Move command on the workbook window when it is not maximized. Use the arrow keys to move the window, and when finished press ENTER, or ESC to cancel.

F8

Turns extend mode on or off. In extend mode, Extended Selection appears in the status line, and the arrow keys extend the selection.

SHIFT+F8 enables you to add a nonadjacent cell or range to a selection of cells by using the arrow keys.

CTRL+F8 performs the Size command (on the Control menu for the workbook window) when a workbook is not maximized.

ALT+F8 displays the Macro dialog box to create, run, edit, or delete a macro.

F9

Calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks.

SHIFT+F9 calculates the active worksheet.

CTRL+ALT+F9 calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.

CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+F9 rechecks dependent formulas, and then calculates all cells in all open workbooks, including cells not marked as needing to be calculated.

CTRL+F9 minimizes a workbook window to an icon.

F10

Turns key tips on or off. (Pressing ALT does the same thing.)

SHIFT+F10 displays the shortcut menu for a selected item.

ALT+SHIFT+F10 displays the menu or message for an Error Checking button.

CTRL+F10 maximizes or restores the selected workbook window.

F11

Creates a chart of the data in the current range in a separate Chart sheet.

SHIFT+F11 inserts a new worksheet.

ALT+F11 opens the Microsoft Visual Basic For Applications Editor, in which you can create a macro by using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).

F12

Displays the Save As dialog box.

Ready-made Microsoft Office tools

​If the thought of memorizing key combinations makes you wince, you can still save time and effort while working in all Office programs by using these built-in tools.

  • Shortcut menus. Right-click in any Microsoft Office program to display a shortcut menu that gives you quick access to many of the most commonly used features. If an arrow appears next to your selection, you can click to see more options. For example, right-clicking a Word document displays Paste Options, Look Up, Synonyms, formatting, and other options.

    Microsoft Word document with two shortcut menus displayed
    No matter which Microsoft Office program you’re working in, right-clicking is one of the greatest shortcuts available.
  • KeyTips. Introduced in Microsoft Office 2007, KeyTips are built-in keyboard shortcuts available in all programs that have the Ribbon or the Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar. In Office 2010, KeyTips are also available in the Backstage view. Press Alt to display a letter or number by each Ribbon tab or Quick Access Toolbar command. After you press a letter or number, you get new KeyTips letters and numbers to access each command in the location you selected.

    Office 2010 Ribbon with KeyTips displayed
    Pressing Alt displays KeyTips that you can press to quickly access any command.
  • Quick Access Toolbar. Add the commands you use all the time to your Quick Access Toolbar in all Office programs that have the Ribbon. Just right-click almost any Ribbon command, and then click Add to Quick Access Toolbar. This is also a great way to create custom keyboard shortcuts for your favorite commands across all Office programs, since the KeyTips for your Quick Access Toolbar items remain the same as long as the command remains in the same position in the Quick Access Toolbar.

Track Your email Conversations

Outlook 2010 has a great new feature for organizing messages by date and arranging them by Conversation. Using this feature, messages that share the same subject appear as Conversations that can be viewed and expanded or collapsed by clicking the icon to the left of the Subject line. The messages within each Conversation are sorted with the newest message on top. When a new message is received, the entire Conversation moves to the top of your message list, helping to make tracking email threads a snap. 

To turn on Conversations, on the View tab, in the Conversations group, select the Show as Conversations check box. You can reduce the size of a conversation with the Clean Up feature, which deletes duplicate messages in the Conversation. On the Home tab, in the Delete group, click Clean Up, and then click Clean Up Conversation.
 
In all versions of Outlook, you can find messages in mailbox folders more quickly by changing how they're sorted in your email folders. For example, you can arrange your email by date, sender, file size, or level of importance.

Group or ungroup items automatically

  • To add or remove grouping in an arrangement, on the View tab, in the Arrangement group, click More for the arrangement gallery, and then click Show in Groups.

Group items manually or create a custom group

  1. On the View tab, in the Current View group, click Change View, and then click Save Current View As a New View.
  2. Type a name for the new view, and then click OK.
  3. On the View tab, in the Current View group, click View Settings.
  4. Click Group By.
  5. Clear the Automatically group according to arrangement check box.
  6. In the Group items by box, click a field (field: An element of a table that contains a specific item of information, such as a last name. A Title field might contain Mr. or Ms. Databases such as Microsoft SQL Server refer to fields as columns.) to group by.
If the field that you want is not in the Group items by box, click a different field set in the Select available fields from box.
  1. Click Ascending or Descending for the sort order of the group headings.
  2. To display the field that you are grouping items by, select the Show field in view check box.
  3. To group by subgroups, click a field in the Then by box.
  4. In the Expand/collapse defaults list, click the default for how you want groups to display in the view.
After closing the dialog box, display or hide items in a group by clicking Expand or Collapse.

Ungroup items manually

  1. On the View tab, in the Current View group, click View Settings.
  2. Click Group By.
  3. In the Group By box, clear the Automatically group according to arrangement check box.

Desktop Virtualization and Security

As desktop virtualization technology has matured and gained widespread implementation, organizations around the world increasingly recognize the broad spectrum of benefits it delivers and view it as a strategic investment that forms a fundamental part of their IT infrastructure.

Beyond the impact on business flexibility, productivity and efficiency, desktop virtualization can also play an important role in risk management by transforming the way organizations approach information security and compliance.

Familiar advantages of desktop virtualization include
  • the ability to enable a more flexible workplace
  • support for mobile workers and associated work styles
  • providing IT with an effective way to manage the growing variety of computing devices in use across an organization.
  • contributes significant savings
  • more-efficient desktop management
  • reduction of office space and real estate costs
 
Security has now joined these benefits as a key factor in the decision to implement desktop virtualization. In fact, 92 percent of the organizations that will have desktop virtualization in place by the end of 2013 are adopting it in part to improve information security.
 
The security benefits of desktop virtualization are inherent in its architecture, which revolves around the centralization of desktops, applications and data for delivery to endpoint devices. This consolidation supports highly effective central management and granular, policy-based access control, and supports compliance requirements through the monitoring, logging and reporting of information access and usage.
 
Flexible options for the delivery of desktops, applications and data to authorized workers, including the ability of these workers to use any type of endpoint device—PC, laptop, thin client, tablet or smartphone—enables the organization to protect its information while optimizing worker flexibility. Indeed, 95 percent of the senior IT decision makers implementing desktop virtualization consider it very effective for protecting information while enabling workers with fast and effective access to the information they require.
 
An effective information security strategy must ensure the security of an organization’s data and application resources while allowing workers to access the resources they need, when and where they need them—a balance made possible only through desktop virtualization.
 
Organizations in every part of the world increasingly share this view, and are making desktop virtualization a central part of their security strategy.

Cloud Computing Taxonomy

I thought the slide below gives you a clearer view of what the cloud technology Offers today. Not much is needed to explain as everything below is plain.

Cloud Computing Taxonomy.png

IaaS – Infrastructure as a Service
PaaS – Platform as a Service
SaaS – Software as a Service
Note: In IaaS, the Operating System is partially managed by the vendor and the rest by the customer.

10 Plus One Points To Note While Building And Delivering Presentations – The Steve Jobs Style

Ever since the launch of his first product, Steve Jobs transformed product launches into an art form. His bold vision for media consumption and his rise as the World’s most celebrated corporate storyteller helped make Apple the most valuable company in the world. We can learn a lot from the way he built and delivered his presentations. 

1.     Create a narrative. Use the story boarding method - brainstorm, sketch and white-board – age old but essential techniques to create a narrative before building slides – plan for demos, include videos and collect such “attention grabbing” items that will go into the presentation before actually building one.
2.     Simplify the description. – Use just one sentence to describe the product or the service or the point in contention in the slide so that this will get carried home by the listeners – fill in the details during the presentation or share the details at your web site.
3.     Present the competition as the villain. This allows the audience to rally around the hero which is your product or service. Even a problem or a pain-point could be presented as the villain.
4.     Position the benefits of your product or solution. Why should I care? What does this have for me? What is in it for me? Highlight the answers to these questions in the presentation. Top 3 reasons why…could be one such take-off point.
5.     Follow the “rule of three”. – Three sections of the presentation, three points to be discussed, three solutions to consider, three items to follow up – easy to remember, recall or recollect. This applies exclusively to a verbally delivered presentation.
6.     Sell your dream. Show them the bigger picture beyond the product or service or the solution. How does it cater to or satisfy your need? How does this solution address the larger issues?
7.     Visualize the points. Use pictures, photos and videos to impress your points upon the audience minds. Reduce the number of words. Remember the adage – a picture is worth thousand words.
8.     Put your numbers into context. Make them more meaningful by placing your numbers in perspective - how it sits against the competition or what share it has in the wider view of things.
9.     Use simple language. Avoid jargons and ambiguous words by making your message clear and direct.
10.   Set a climax moment. Build your points and pace your message towards a high moment of emotional release. This is sure to drive home the message you intend to convey.

 

11.   Practice your presentation. Rehearse it as many number of times you can to make the delivery seem effortless. The presentation skills are honed only through practice.